Early Childhood Educator

Diana Tjin

There's the story of an old lady who lived in a shoe with many children. I think if there were to be a play about it my team and I can probably score the lead on that. We are constantly on the move and problem solving throughout the day mixed with a number of incredibly positive moments watching children do amazing things and being able to share experiences with them and their families. Part of our main responsibilities at work is to teach and provide opportunities for children to develop effective social skills. This can be both exhausting and exhilarating as it seems like we are constantly advocating to have these kind of skills to be more appreciated. Society and even the children themselves tend to talk about who can be the strongest, fastest, and even the meanest as more desirable characteristics to have versus emotional intelligence and effective collaborative skills. People tend to think that preschool / daycare is basically a place where children learn to do simple academic skills as well as how to be 'nice.' However, it is definitely far more involved as we all know how important the early years are in a child's overall development. Teaching young children about emotional intelligence and problem solving skills are definitely worth every effort if one wishes to live in a more inclusive and intelligent society. This kind of society will not only need more individuals who can be academically and/or technically inclined but also who can be adequately skilled at being socially responsible for themselves, others, and the physical environment that we live in.
Area   
Vancouver and Lower Mainland (area 3)

Kathy Bergman

I go in and watch, ask the children questions as to what they are doing and also one never knows what's going to happen as a toddler is like watching a butterfly; one never know what direction they are going to go. To watch their learning and thinking process is rewarding yet challenging as you never know what they are going to ask next.
Area   
Vancouver and Lower Mainland (area 3)

Caroline Kent

I work with infants and toddlers and my work day varies depending on my shift. Things that are consistent are engaging in play with the children inside and outdoors in our playground. I join them while they are eating and help them when needed. I attend their personal needs and sit with them while they nap. I write journals about their daily experiences for parents to read. I also write documentation about learning that was taking place during their play.
Area   
Vancouver and Lower Mainland (area 3)

Colleen Howe

A typical day begins with bright faces yelling "hi Colleen!" often accompanied by hugs. Some stories with children that are saying goodbye to their parents follows. As they begin to know snack time is upon them they are very excited to sit together and enjoy a warm, homemade snack. Next is outside time, sensory time or large motor activities indoors, depending on the day. As it nears lunch the littler ones start their meals and are getting tired. Bottles, rocking and patting backs while lullabies call these little ones to dreamland ensues. After a nice rest they are up and ready to visit, read stories, then eat and play all over again! They love the predictable routine of their days at the centre.
Area   
West Kootenay (Area 9)

Tessa Wolbaum

Constantly shadowing a child that needs support to help with personal safety, communication and cognitive functions.
Area   
West Kootenay (Area 9)

John Zhang

A typical work day should be a happy day with harmony between the management and the employees with transparent communication and fair treatment of each other!
Area   
Vancouver and Lower Mainland (area 3)

Christie Forde

In the daycare, walk in say hi and a whirlwind happens and suddenly it's home time. No day is typical in its details. We of course have structure/routine. But as much as I love my job it's way too exhausting to write about the whole day!
Area   
Fraser Valley (area 4)

Lisa (Lee)

In the sandbox or digging in the garden with children
Area   
Vancouver and Lower Mainland (area 3)

Michelle Davis

Playing, cuddling, having snack, kissing owies, hugs, going outside, rubbing backs for nap time, giving bottles, singing songs.
Area   
West Kootenay (Area 9)

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